Protest on College Campus

Throughout the day on Thursday students on the University of Tennessee campus gathered to protest the presidency of Donald Trump. At the height of the protest there was up to 300 students participating in both the protest and the counter-protest. Students, forming a ring around the sitting ‘marginalized’ students, chanted and repeated slogans from the speakers of the event. In an explanation of the purpose of the protest, one of the speakers elaborated that it “is not a pro-Hillary protest, it is a fuck Donald Trump protest.”

I joined the protest around 2:00 pm on my way to class and stayed for a few spare hours. Just walking close to 100 meters away from the gathering I knew instantly what it was, the police cars parked along the road with flashing lights only confirmed my suspicion. I gathered later that it was organized by the campus diversity organization. After positioning myself in the crowd I found myself chanting along with them, although abstaining once or twice when I found their slogans distasteful. A few of the favored rallying cries were “Not my president”, “Fuck Donald Trump”, and the now famous “No Trump, no KKK, no fascists USA.” The chorus to Kendrick Lamar’s song “Alright” was also frequently chanted, which is always expected.

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Image of the crowd when I first arrived.

The only time I found the speakers to be distasteful is when they handed a microphone to a young man standing in the corner. I’m paraphrasing but his words were along the line of “I’m against all forms of bigotry and I stand with you, but maybe we could give Trump a chance first.” I didn’t care too much for that and the crowd lost interest, but then a girl standing next to him was given a microphone and said something along the lines of “I don’t agree with him but we should respect all opinions even if we think they are wrong.” The crowd cheered for that one. Now, one of the main speakers (there were close to 4 of them) responded with the following “I agree, but are you saying we should respect hatred and bigotry?” and continued with that. She was so quick to shut down the opposition even when one of the true protesters stood up for it. I should note that the main speaker shutting them down didn’t get hardly as many cheers.

It was close to this time that the counter-protesters began to arrive in greater numbers. There people with Trump signs drawn onto pizza boxes, Trump flags wrapped around them as capes, and even one young man dressed as Donald Trump himself, wig and all, carrying around the United States flag. They made their way to the outskirts of the protest and began their own chants and openly mocking the protesters. Only one scuffle broke out from what I could see. Shortly after those in the middle resumed sitting and the speakers reminded the crowd that they were nonviolent.

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When the first counter-protesters began to arrive.

Various other people in the crowd got chances to be given a microphone and tell their story, the crowd was overall very receptive. This went on for some time and officially dispersed close to 4, however the vast majority of the crowd stuck around. As time went on more and more Trump supporters came with signs and flags even though the protest was considered to be over. The less organized the event look the more the police had a reason to surround and infiltrate the crowd, but nothing ever came of it. At one point near the end the cops began handing out snacks to the protesters that stuck around, something I made sure to thank them for.

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A stray communist flag hanging from a tree.

I want to keep this post brief, but one point I can’t help but make is that the Trump supporters had an obvious air of triumph, bordering on smug. They had already won and from what I’ve heard is that many of them feel the protests are just a nuisance. This is exactly why we need to keep fighting. There is much I would have changed about the structure of this particular protest but I’ll deal with that in a future article, for now I would like to add that a loosely unified left is better than nothing else. And with that I’d encourage students on campuses everywhere to do the same and protest.

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140 thoughts on “Protest on College Campus

  1. I detest Donald Trump, but he was fairly elected under the system as it is. Given that, what is the purpose of the protest? You cannot reasonably, unless explosive new information emerges, suggest that he should be prevented from assuming the Presidency, and I assume you would not have approved of the demonsrations by Trump supporters that would have taken place if the result had been different.

    I fear there will be much to protest or even, in the worst case scenario, to resist. The fact of his election is not one of them.

    Liked by 5 people

    • What is the purpose? To keep people mobilized after the election and give Trump the hostile greeting he deserves from people of color whom he did so much to attack (and legitimize racist attacks on) during his campaign. But continuous mobilization in the streets won’t be enough to stop the Trump agenda — the next blow we have to strike is the midterm elections in 2018 when the entire House of Representatives is up for grabs along with dozens of Senate seats (stay tuned to Ourrevolution.com). Then from there is the 2020 election in which we can get rid of Trump by electing Bernie Sanders who I think would be the front-runner/semi-incumbent if he decided to run again in the Democratic Party primary.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Perhaps I’m making too pernickety a point. Demonstrations are appropriate, as showing disagreement and, indeed, disgust with the creature who now degrades the office of President. Protests at the fact of the inauguration – no, for the reasons I stated.

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    • Many horrible men throughout history have been fairly elected. I don’t believe we should settle with our situation, to create a future we truly believe we need then we must be willing to work for it.

      As for if Hillary had won, I would be willing to protest even that if the protests weren’t strongly demanding for a Trump victory.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Again, I enjoyed your article and, in fact, have had the pleasure of reading many of them. I find myself now puzzled with your insistence we should not “settle with our situation”. I am open to any suggestions as to how you would “not settle” for the results of this election. I do not understand your last statement at all about the protesters. It’s simple. You are willing to protest against Trump but protest against Hillary if ‘what”? These protesters are Hillary supporters demanding a Hillary victory. I don’t see the difference. You are young and I appreciate your enthusiasm and concern about our elections. It is going to take the younger ones to get this country “fixed”. Best Wishes.

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    • Agreed. I think Trump and Bannon and plenty of others in his camp are absolutely among the deplorables. I don’t know how anyone could hear the laundry list of icky shit that Trump has been a part of and STILL BE ABLE TO VOTE FOR HIM. I think people voted with their wallets and the desire for more jobs, aboslutely ignoring the stuff that, to me, was impossible to ignore.

      As you’ve said, he was fairly elected. I’m sorry, anti-Trumpers, but it’s time to get over it. Either let him hang himself through his own words and deeds, or let him prove us all wrong. Either way, protests aren’t going to effect much change.

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  2. How can you expect the followers of a clown that won election by being as nasty as possible to be gracious in victory? Pardon me, but we are not talking rocket science in Trump’s victory, we are talking Hitler-style rabble rousing, complete with the thugs beating up any opposition. I cannot but foresee Trumps followers getting more vicious and violent as the opposition solidifies,

    The likelihood that the police will back up the Trump thugs is pretty high also – very few police have the intellect or thought process to understand what is really going on, and police by nature and training follow authority figures, which (sad to say) Trump now is. Anyway, good luck, try to not get your head cracked, and remember that Trumps thugs are pretty much thick in the skull by definition.

    Liked by 4 people

    • For some reason I doubt you’d say the same thing to Trump protesters if Hillary had won. Taking financial aid to students and whipping their asses if they disagree with your opinion? It’s odd that you compare them to Nazis but that is the most totalitarian stance ive heard recently.

      Liked by 8 people

      • You are wrong. Conservatives do not attack people and destroy property, even when they lose. Most of these kids are indoctrinated and led into such displays…by rabid, hate-filled leftists…if they thought about the issues for a few hours, they would have voted for Mr. Trump. We (Americans), are tired of the violence and hate from “liberals”…they should go get a tattoo or a latte and stay off the streets. As far as their aid money…The government takes money from people who work…carpenters, plumbers, factory workers and so on…and gives it to these dipshits who protest the working peoples choice for president…while destroying the working people’s property…It’s wrong.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Indoctrinated by leftists? That is just silly, and I’ll tell you why. I can take the argument you just made and supplement it for practically any group. X destroys property while us Y’s are civil, X should go [insert stereotype], ect. It seems you have a large amount of hatred so there’s no point in arguing for either of us.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Don’t get mad, or torch someone’s truck…I rather enjoy a bit of sparring now and then. I’m simply stating the truth, or at least my perspective of it…I love the U.S.A., and JESUS, and my family…but I DO hate evil. If you visit our site and look at the posts on indoctrination and education, it would really help you understand. I am a college student, and I have seen the way many courses are set up to smear the U.S. and to steer the students into socialism…

            Liked by 3 people

                • I can’t take you seriously anymore, good job. Where did the discussion of the Frankfurt school come from? And what does it have to do with anything? I don’t believe in the tenets of critical theory and it shows me you obviously don’t care about having a true argument. I’m done.

                  Liked by 2 people

                  • O.K….last attempt. The Frankfurt School is where all this anti-American, racial divide crap was formed. What it has to do with is that it’s a blueprint for the anti-American tripe you are force fed in “English Literature,” “Environmental Science,” and other classes. I thought we were having a true debate…Hey, take care, I think you write well and I wish you the best. We still follow your site, and may GOD smile on you.

                    Liked by 4 people

                    • Most persistent, but most stupid. Like Faux Noise, you repeat the same lies over and over, expecting someone to believe you because of the repetition. When your ears and mind are as open as your mouth, the there can be discussion, but you wouldn’t be the same sort of freak you are now.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Freak…nice. We, Americans, repeat the TRUTH, hoping it will sink in with the tiny, noisy, violent left. All your response amounts to is insults, not discussion, and there is no need for discussion. One side is correct, and the left is simply incorrect, with nothing of value to add to any discussion. You have been fed lies, by bitter people full of hate, and unlike most people, you choose the easy route of clinging to the falsehoods you’ve been indoctrinated with, and angrily attacking the truth. May GOD introduce Himself to you, open your eyes, and help you.
                      My point was that these students belong in class. People are working to loan them, and grant them, money to study…not give their opinions on the President of the United States. Mr. Trump has done nothing that could be construed as “racist,” misogynist,” or any other of the fake crap words the left made-up, doesn’t understand, and throws at anyone who disagrees with their idiocy. There is nothing to protest. NOTHING. Science has proven that risk assessment and judgement are not fully developed until around age 25, so these embarrassing “educated ones” really should not be allowed to vote, unless they have earned it in the U.S. military, which matures and develops individuals. Also, I think this particular “protest” was at an SEC school, not some libbie enclave. They should have had their asses whipped and been sent home, and lose their financial aid.
                      https://triggerreset.net/2016/06/03/flag-burning-commie-freaks-meet-american-college-students-who-beg-to-differ/

                      Liked by 2 people

                    • I’ll let that stand on its own – I can’t add anything that would make it more ridiculous than you did. Just be careful that you don’t get caught smoking that stuff.

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            • You quite obviously have NO idea what you are talking about. Your mixing of religion and politics, for instance, shows that you haven’t the least idea why the founding fathers put the prohibition of a state religion into the Bill of Rights, so your civic education failed in elementary school.

              As to hating “evil”, please define the word in terms that someone who is not conservatively brainwashed can understand. I am willing to bet that you can’t even start without references to “scripture” and this Bible you talk about. Since our society is based on the rule of law not some religious maunderings, none of your “scripture” matters except as it is encoded in our laws. Trump with his thugs, his misogyny, and his open hatred is a lot closer to evil than anything you have mentioned, so perhaps you need to pull your head into this century before you start running your mouth.

              Fortunately, Trump’s electorate is the group that will suffer the worst under him, so you will get what you have earned, probably in a deliciously poetic fashion. By the time Trump is done, you will be begging for socialism so you can get fed.

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              • The prohibition was against favoring one denomination of Christianity over another. I don’t define evil, it was already defined long ago. If you want some examples go to the link I provided you. Trump never expressed misogyny or hate, perhaps you should expand your news sources a bit. I’ll “run my mouth” anytime I please.

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                • And you have twisted minds to go with your twisted religion and your twisted revisionist history. The founding fathers knew there was more than Christianity in the world – at least one of them was atheist, so the odds of your misinterpretation having any bearing on anything are zero. As to their running mouth, well, you are like s bad case of diarrhea, you run anytime you want, but it is still very obvious what is coming out.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Sir, I don’t have time to raise you, that was your daddy’s job. You are simply wrong. You have done nothing but display the ignorance, intolerance, and hate that fester on the left…your attitude is one major reason why your ideology was defeated. You have no facts, just insults. You’ve insulted me, my beliefs, my intelligence, and the nation. Not one example or fact to support your opinion, just spittle-flecked rage. You are sad, and I hope you take some time to reflect on what you believe, and why…

                    Liked by 2 people

                    • Sir, you have become your own parody. My “ideology” as you call it is simply the march of time, and has only been slowed by your ignorance. Your “intelligence” has shown itself by its absence, and you insult yourself by spraying your insanity around as if it had any connection to the real world. As, too “ignorance, intolerance and hate”, one glance at your web site is enough to show that you are a poster child for those things.

                      As to my daddy raising me, since you must descend to that level, I will tell you that what he raised were his fists and his belt and his two by four. Even you would have learned to think in that environment, so maybe it would have been good for you, but I am still bleeding emotionally some 40 years later. You have once again proven your stupidly and sub-human level of understanding on a very personal level. Goodbye.

                      Liked by 2 people

                    • Frank/Freeda, your posts have been insulting and filled with fiction instead of fact. Many of the Founding Fathers were Deists, and Franklin even invited a representative of Islam to Philadelphia to preach. Your reference to the Frankfurt School is irrelevant, just as that school has become (except perhaps to some reactionary polemicists). I read Marcuse as a freshman in college; I doubt that most people since have even heard of him. Yet, to you, no one else has any facts on which to base their thoughts. Your personal insults have to place in any kind of conversation.

                      Liked by 2 people

        • I don’t disagree with destruction of property being wrong. The problem is that you are one of those that watched Faux Noise the whole time, instead of watching Trump’s rabble rousing and encouraging his thugs to beat up the opposition. You are obviously blind, in the eyes and in the brain, so the next time you open your mouth, stick your foot in it before you convince even more people of how stupid you are. Your boy Trump is the rabid one, and you have nothing to stand on in his defense, because he did it in front of millions of witnesses (and obviously some “witlesses” as well.)

          Liked by 3 people

            • In case anyone was too busy arguing to notice, today was a rather interesting day. The BBC reports seem to be the most precise. Trump expressed agreement with the core principles of “Obamacare”, indicating that it would be changed but not dismantled; Trump kicked Christie to the curb and is having Pence assemble his Cabinet, made up mostly of DC insiders. I’m not sure who won this election, because I’m not sure Trump is doing anything different than what Hillary would have done.

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              • I noticed this too, however it doesn’t bring me any hope. Trump seems to be influenced by anyone he spoke to last, meaning he is likely to flip on this issue again. As for the DC insiders I don’t see anything else he could have done, aside from appointing someone like Rush Limbaugh to his cabinet. He’s talked of installing the leading climate skeptic to the EPA and even Ben Carson for Secretary of Education. He’s creating a highly fundamentalist fundamentalist administration.

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              • I noticed this too, and it (and the comments above) only goes to show how polarized we are as a nation. Each side has valid complaints about the other, but is incapable of seeing their own internal issues. If you wear your R, the DNC is evil. If you wear a D, the RNC is evil. Hitler and various other insults are thrown around and they talk AT each other, rather than TO each other. Yes, because the DNC is better organized and more disciplined, they have an army of goons to get violent. They have professional protesters and the like. BUT, let us be clear… if the RNC was organized enough they’d happily use the same tactics. Further, both sides have no real desire to SOLVE anything because they want these issues around so they can argue and campaign over it, firing up their bases. It is why you need outsiders, willing and capable of standing up to the machine. Sadly the third parties are too disorganized and self-destructive to be viable solutions but I have hope that the truth will eventually set us free from the shackles of the two party system that gave us HRC v Trump as the best we can do. I could go on, but I’ll call it here! 🙂

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                • I like your post with the exception about the “army of goons.” Neither side has that. However, courtesy of the NRA, we have a society oversaturated with weapons which are waiting to be used. The major political parties won’t drive their use, but if there comes a time when we have to declare martial law to restore peace, the Constitution will become “a scrap of paper”.

                  Liked by 2 people

                  • The WikiLeaks revelation show that the DNC hired professional protestors. If you don’t wanna call them an “army of goons” that is fine. Whatever you call it, we’ve issues with our two party system. I used to ignore it, these guys on each side represent a small vocal minority. Then I was reminded by my Masters advisor that the US Revolution happened with two vocal minorities (for and against the Crown). Sometimes the loudest voice wins, and if it happens again America loses. As for the NRA and guns, I think our 2nd Amendment protects from our government. It amazes and amuses me when those against the 2nd Amendment do so with the argument that our Founders couldn’t foresee the change of technology and it really only applied to muskets etc. If that were true, then the 1st Amendment is gone because they couldn’t foresee iPads and the like. No, the Founders had it right and every time we’ve mucked it up for political expediency with no thought towards longevity we’ve made things worse. And I’m not one to fear martial law. I served with those guys, they’d no more turn their guns on their own people than you would.

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                    • Well, Thomas Jefferson did say that all laws should be trashed and rewritten every 20 years. We might be a better society had we done that.
                      We’ve already left the realm of the Amendments. We only adhere to them very selectively, if at all. In the 1800s, it was acceptable to burn an effigy of the President in a political campaign. Now, most criticism of the President is considered a crime, and “burning in effigy” would be an act of Terrorism. So, I’m going to argue that the First Amendment is already toast. The Patriot Act was the butter on the toast.
                      Washington himself used troops to put down a Whiskey Rebellion shortly after creation of the republic, so the argument that the right to bear arms is to protect oneself from one’s own government has little historical merit. The focus was on defense against Native Americans and foreign invaders. For that matter, his descendants used arms to try to put down a revolt in the Virginia mountain counties when they refused to join the Confederacy. So, the history of the Second Amendment is rife with pretense and disingenuity. Do as the words say but not as the writers did. In fact, past leaders of the NRA were advocates for gun control.
                      And the notion that a 44 can stand up to a trained marksman with a sniper rifle, or a tank, rocket or tactical nuke, or rocket-equipped drone, is simply insane. Yes, technology has changed. No, the founding fathers didn’t foresee what has happened. However, their own actions at the time — and their words — argue that they never intended that people take up arms against their own government.
                      The current noise about the Second Amendment (not a debate as no one is listening) brings to mind the Polish cavalry charging German panzers in 1939. Very romantic, and very stupid, with very predictable results.

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                    • First, you’re right from a historical perspective but the Whiskey Rebellion was a policing action because it involved the participants dealing with private property. That one is a hard analogy to use. You’re right about what happened in the mountains of Virginia though and those men failed to live up to the ideals of their Founders. And yes, sometimes our Founders failed to live up to their own ideals. Also, I realize I’m an outlier on this one, regarding the 2nd Amendment. But I’ve been to 3rd World Countries and seen how an unarmed populace can be abused. If I had my way, the people would be as well equipped as the government but I realize it will never happen. Obviously, not a WMD but that is also a contradiction and I see it in myself. It isn’t an easy topic, but I worry since our government is already so totalitarian and getting worse every year. And it isn’t an RNC or DNC thing, it’s both of them.

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                    • You’re not so much an outlier. I have family members who are avid hunters. The rule with them is that you don’t kill for sport; you use what you kill, and they do. I respect that. In truth, gun laws need to be situational, in the same way the regulation of speed on roads is. Driving 75 on a highway is fine; not on a city street. If someone is in the desert, I don’t care what kind of weapon them own. However, I don’t want to see someone carrying any kind of machinegun or assault gun down Market Street in Philadelphia. We had a case recently of a child killed while asleep in his bed, from a random spray of bullets, one of which penetrated his bedroom wall. We just don’t need that.

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                    • I can agree with that. Also, with freedom comes responsibility so violators of the gun laws (not the crazy ones created just to stifle the 2nd Amendment) should be dealt with harshly.

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                  • But that aside, I do appreciate how you’re comments have been logical and well reasoned… even if time and further discourse shows we might disagree on points. I don’t know that we do, but I don’t need you to agree with me. If you’ve well thought our and researched reasons for your sincerely held beliefs than I respect them. I don’t like when people on both sides just get emotional and shout bumper sticker slogans that accomplish nothing. Admittedly though, sometimes blog threads are hard places to converse… but I respect everyone for making the effort. Every time they do, it means those who died defending our freedoms didn’t die in vain.

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                    • Thank you. I spent 35 years in market research, and before that in grad school in pol sci and statistics. I like making sure of the facts before I say anything, and I really dislike hyperbole and pointless noise. However, I’m also a fan of that great folk song, “Have you been to jail for justice?” I have my own blog on WordPress (Crain’s Comments). You might be amused. Most of my posts contain footnotes, and I try not to post anything unless I’ve got something worthwhile. I don’t care what I’m having for lunch most of the time; I can’t imagine why anyone else would want to know.

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            • You are an amazing nut job. You are so far too the right that you are wrapping back around on the left side, and the shear insanity of what you post is frightening. In the spirit of Sun Tzu “Keep your friends close, but your enemies closer” I think I will follow you so that I know when you are moving and make sure there are police and mental health professionals (with straight jackets) on the scene wherever you are.

              Liked by 1 person

              • You should follow our site. If you take the time to actually read the posts, instead of simply cherry pick for an item to use to support your bias, it would do you some good. As far as the last sentence, that almost appears to be a threat…that’s stupid behavior. I would advise you NEVER attempt to approach me, or any member of my family…ever.

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  3. Unfortunately you do live in a democracy, you had 8 years of a very extreme leftist guy, now is time for change. Trump did win fair and square, you obviously disagree with his policies, but the name calling I don´t find it productive. What do you gain by calling the man and half of America fascist? Nothing productive for sure. Give the man a chance at least. And if you don´t like him attack his policies but the name calling only makes the other side small and bitter that don´t know how to take a loss. By the way, I only see the left protesting and very rearely do you see the right doing a counter protest. You said they seemed smug, well ofcourse, they won. That is democracy. You just have to accept it. You said the fight still has to continue, he hasn´t even started to govern, you don´t know what he´s going to do. I certainly respect the right to protest, but the name calling and this so called “fight” I find it fruitless.
    He already won, what´s the point of protesting? You can start doing other productive things if you want a change for your side in the next election. Start a thinktank or something that will provide serious debate about certain policies. But just standing there chanting or better said name calling the only thing that you achieve is……nothing really.

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    • Would you encourage dissenters under Stalin to be passive, on the grounds that he “won” ? I think not. If you do not see the right protesting then just look at the tea party protests we’ve had in recent years. And the very idea that Obama was an extreme leftist… well I can’t help you there. If you believe his centrist policies were extreme left then you have some reading to do.

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      • I do live in Spain, a socialist country. And the policies that Obama put in place are exactly the same we have here.
        I really don´t need to read, I have lived under socialism.
        By the way is Don the Trump now Stalin? And I should say that I would encourage dissenters under Stalin to be passive for a simple reason, you get killed or thrown to the gulag.

        I´m pretty sure Trump now is making his palace of Trump Tower in NY a gulag…..
        You are very lucky to live in the U.S, you have no idea what it is living in a country like Spain. But if you like socialist policies….good luck, because here we have over 20% unemployment with those policies. I can´t find a job in Burger King, just working in whatever comes, be it a week in some construction site, or doing little chores here and there in gardens, shitty jobs. So trust me that you are lucky, since you haven´t lived in other countries with other types of governments you don´t realise it.

        I thought I was being quite nice when I wrote the comment, it was a productive comment. So your last part of “you have some reading to do”, first of all my man I´m 34 working my tail off so not much time for the reading thing, and second I do have more experience in life than you and have been in really harsh places, living a real harsh life that you entitle students of now, have no idea.

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        • Charlypriest, are you really unaware that Spain has a Conservative government (the centre-right party, PP, has been in power for 12 of the pst 20 years)? You, like Trump voters, have much to be discontented about, but I fear you are venting your discontent on the wrong target.

          (But that’s three comments from me already on this thread; so I shall say no more)

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          • I´m well aware of PP, but you can hardly call the PP a really conservative party. You pay almost 50% of the money you earn to the state, and here is not the PP governing, as you maybe know we have been almost 1 year without an official president, hence no policies passing since here if they don´t have a complete majority, the leftist and independent parties( when I say independent it means here that are parties that want certain regions of Spain to get the hell out of Spain and be their own country) will join forces and we end up with 3 different political parties ruling the country which is a mess. I can go on forever about our political system, as you probably know the socialist agenda is so ingrained in the system and in the mindset of the Spanish people that you just can´t change it at this stage. I won´t go more into details since one I don´t have the time and second this will turn into a dissertation paper.

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        • I meant no disrespect when saying you have reading to do, all I mean to say is that you either don’t know much about Obama’s policy or we have very different conceptions of extreme left. For the record, I would not consider Spain to be a socialist country, neither would any actual leftist. France may have a socialist president and yet it is increasingly estranged to socialist principles. Spain may be the same way. This is the same principle that the Nazis (National Socialists) weren’t socialists and the Soviet Union wasn’t communist they were state capitalist, despite what those groups themselves may claim.

          I greatly realize how privileged I am but that does not mean I don’t feel for others in struggle across the world, and it also does not mean I should not work to continually improve the country I live in.

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          • We agree to disagree as the saying goes. And I do really find it good that you feel that you should work to improve the country in which you live in. I might not agree with your policies (I am very aware about Obamas) but I certainly respect your enthusiasm and being engage to improve a democratic nation.

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      • The people who you are talking to have not, in all likelihood, read so much as a newspaper in a number of years. Faux Noise has completely supplanted any useful news source for the Trump people – you might even say it created Trump. Save your breath for people whose ears and eyes are connected to a functioning brain.

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        • Another blatant lie – your batting average is not real good. Besides, the Tea Party shutting the government down dwarfs anything else that you have called out as evil – you really need to fact check yourself.

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            • You are right – I don’t need brainwashed crap from yet another Faux Noise-worthy propaganda video. I glanced at your web site, and the first thing I saw was some crazy biblical references, which completely shot any interest I had in seeing what you had to say.

              I live in the Bible belt, and am constantly having my nose rubbed in ignorance and stupidity disguised as piety – people telling me this and that without the slightest intent (or the ability) to do themselves what they tell me. The Bible has become the first refuge of scoundrels and con men in the hands of people like you who twist it around to mean whatever you want it to.

              As to shutting down the government, you are obviously blinded by you own self-righteousness. People who require government services cannot just stop living just because you (in your childish simple-mindedness) decided that you were going to take your ball and go home when you couldn’t get what you demanded through legitimate and time-tested compromise and normal political methods. You only show your absolute contempt for our Constitution and form of government by advocating such methods.

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      • Nobody accused Trump of intelligence or good intentions, and he has demonstrated none. He has stated his intent to tear down this government, however you name it. He has also demonstrated his intent to destroy a lot of the rights that you claim. May I ask what you think you are talking about?

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      • ……….you bore me, and I don´t like webster, he is small and….who is webster? You mean that little dude on that 80´s t.v show? damn, I knew it I knew it.
        Stay Frosty gent. Do some yoga.

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  4. ‘ Would you encourage dissenters under Stalin to be passive, on the grounds that he “won” ?’ Not good enough as an answer. Why the scare quotes? Trump did win, not “win”, the kind of election that America has. There will, I fear, be much in his actions to protest, in due course; but these protests should be about issues, and specifics.

    Meantime you should be building bridges to Republicans, especially in the Senate but from the Campus level on up, against the time when you may have to make common cause against his lawlessness, authoritarianism, and megalomania. Then you will really need to rely on the principle of constitutional legitmacy; respect it.

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    • When Trump admits the legitimacy of the Constitution, then we can with clear consciences admit his legitimacy under that same Constitution. So far all he has done is tear that document down and stomp on it.

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  5. Comments about the blog entries and the protest:
    Blog:
    (1) Characterizing Obama as “far left” just isn’t correct. He’s a lawyer, very establishment, progressive only on the topic of healthcare, and even on that, not very.
    (2) The election was not an endorsement of Trump. It was a rejection of the establishment by people who were minor players in the establishment. Trump voters had above average incomes but no college education — car dealers, insurance agents, owners of small retail stores and small manufacturers. Some are racist. Most are anti-tax, anti-government, anti-welfare and pay their workers low wages. Clinton’s ties to Goldman did as much to harm her as anything else.

    Protest:
    (1) You don’t build support by demonstrating weakness. 300 people on a campus of 25,000 plus is absurd and shows lack of support for the cause. You have to pick and choose what you do. You need to build an organization to give the movement some sense of being real and lasting.
    (2) You have to build alliances with other groups.
    (3) You have to orchestrate events so you don’t have speakers off-message.
    (4) You need adequate media coverage, lined up in advance.
    Unless you prepare properly, you are wasting resources and perhaps hurting your own cause. You were given a brain, use it!

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  6. When Obama won, despite being a first–term senator and unqualified, those that opposed him did not protest and carry on like spoiled children. When reality comes around the corner and hits these protesters in the face – I hope it isn’t too painful.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Reality will come around and deal with Trump’s minions, since what he stands for will destroy anything you have to live for. Good luck with it, poetic justice is ugly.

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        • I am speaking a bit dramatically, but the people that well lose the most under a Trump presidency are the very uneducated and ignorant sorts that he conned into voting for him.

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          • Hasn’t every one had about enough of politics? The campaigns were dirty and people have lost friends over this. Is that what every one wants? I doubt it. And no body ever convinced another person of anything by calling them ignorant. I’m sure many who voted for him could surpass us both.
            I will not be responding to another political or ignorant comment – I’ve had my fill of politics.

            Liked by 1 person

            • I had my full of it long before the election, but now that the worst possible outcome has occurred, I cannot just ignore it. The damage that is coming – to the constitution, the economy and to the basics that most take for granted every day – is too profound and far too destructive to just stick my head in the sand.

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                • I agree the the electoral college is completely outdated, but it’s design was intended to prevent the rise to power of populist demagogues like Trump, so not only is it outdated, but it has failed in its original purpose.

                  I am well aware that I cannot change people’s minds with reason, so at times I lose patience and resort to the tactics of my opponents. That is a personal failing, but you have seen at least some of the insanity and personal attacks that have resulted from any attempt to discuss the situation, no matter how reasonable. I find it very difficult to let insanity and bullying rule anywhere, because I was raised in that environment. I apologize to those bystanders that I have offended, but the bullying and craziness cannot be allowed victory in the long run, and I fight than when I can; I will not resort too inciting violence as Trump does, so that leaves me at&t a decided disadvantage.

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          • “People en masse have protested Obama for almost ten years because they fear Blackness.”
            Your own comment says it. I did not protest Obama, but I didn’t vote for him either. It had nothing to do with Blackness (as you put it), I did not feel a one-term senator was qualified – and that’s all folks.

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                • It means large numbers of people together, it does not mean everyone’s point of view was even represented. The fact that the KKK and the American Nazis both supported Trump speaks to why he was elected, it does not mean that everyone that supported him was racist. It does mean that what he said and how he said it were racist, and on that basis we can safely expect racist actions on his part.

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                  • As I said yesterday – I’m out – we’ve had enough politics for one year, now it’s time to rebuild, our last pres. set out to cause race wars again – and he succeeded.
                    So I’m trying to move forward while you insist on staying stagnant and inching backwards. If you don’t like a law – work to get it changed.

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                    • Wow, “you’re out” but then you start right in again with a completely false cheap shot straight out of Faux Noise. You help elect a completely backwards-facing destroyer, and then have the brass to talk about rebuilding. The rebuilding will occur after your boy is gone, and the race and class wars that he started as part of his divide-and-conquer election strategy burn out.

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  7. I just can’t help thinking that if the situation were reversed—that is, if Hillary Clinton had won, and a bunch of people came out to protest with similar signs and slogans—we would be outraged.

    We have to do better than “Fuck Trump” and “#NotMyPresident”. Oppose racism. Oppose sexism. Oppose bigotry. Oppose white supremacy. Oppose all those things. But when we resort to name-calling or questioning the legitimacy of the election results because our preferred candidate lost, we are no better than those who have resorted to hurling insults at President Obama and Hillary Clinton, and who questioned the legitimacy of Barack Obama’s presidency. If it’s not OK when “they” do it, it can’t be OK when “we” do it—otherwise “they” are perfectly entitled to call us on it.

    These protests are useful in that people are feeling a lot of fear and anxiety, and getting those feelings out are healthy. But we need to be careful about letting these emotions rule us—not just because there is a danger in simply lashing out, but because we don’t know what’s going to happen, we don’t know how Trump is going to govern. Many of the things he said during the campaign are the opposite of what he has said in the past, and it appears he has already started to tone down and/or walk back some of his campaign rhetoric (one report I saw mentioned earlier basically said that the infamous wall was unlikely to happen, but it was a “great campaign device”). Plus we have already heard from Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, the ACLU, and the Southern Poverty Law Center, all of whom are ready to actively oppose him if necessary.

    As Mike Yard (The Nightly Show) put it yesterday, “I hate wasting my panics, so I’ll wait and see what @realDonaldTrump does, before I lose it.”

    Liked by 2 people

    • I agree that the protests need to be more productive. Name calling isn’t the best method and calling others racist is often brushed off as being PC police. I plan to address those things when I’ve fully thought about them more. However, I don’t believe we should wait and see what Trump does first. Perhaps he won’t follow through in his promises and it was all campaign rhetoric, but I think we shouldn’t allow that type of rhetoric in the first place. He could come out with progressive plans for the country and I still believe I’d oppose him, simply for mobilizing people with that discriminatory and bigoted language.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Absolutely call him on his bullshit. Just be careful about burning bridges before they’re built (assuming said building is even a possibility). Like it or not, we’re stuck with him for the next four years. Planning for 2020 has to start now.

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  8. This president elect is owed nothing. It is logical to judge his intentions with doubt and contempt. He has exhibited a long history of far-reaching despicable behavior with the single intention of servicing only himself.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. In all honesty, the man himself is not what worries me the most. He is already backtracking on a lot of what he said, and he probably did not believe half of what was said. What I detest is how he enabled the ugliest parts of America to feel empowered to be horrible. Putting aside the bigotry for a single second, a lot of his supporters will say that they are supporters for his policies, and not because they are bigots. Even though I feel they do not deserve it, I will assume that to be the reason why. But the main problem is that again, he is back peddling already, and also, most of his propositions are not really sound in my opinion. Even if they were (perhaps especially if they are), the willingness for humans to abandon each other for self benefit proves that we have a very long way to go.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. I’ve wandered in from another part of the WP world where things tend to be conducted in a more nuanced pace. So forgive me folk if I sound like something out of the Stoned 60s (actually I was a teenager then, but that’s another story).
    Anyhows(sic), writing from the UK and belonging to a brand of socialism that would have many folk in the US either screaming in disbelief, running away in terror, or shaking their heads sadly, offering me a cup of tea and calling for a doctor to see to this ‘poor old guy’.
    Democracy is an inefficient form of government in that no one is compelled to vote and no one has yet worked out how to satisfactorily get around the problem of translating the vote in a way that everyone feels they were a winner. Having said that all the alternatives are by far and away worse. (Btw, please don’t tell me socialism is not democracy, I’ve been round the arguments for 50 years now).
    It is interesting that this post shows the intent to protest, but also mentions the shortcomings of some in trying to stifle the words of those who weren’t prepared to speak ‘on script’. The mentioning of the sandwiches is also interesting as that would normally fir in the script of some of my fellow socialists. In short I think you have produced a balanced post, from your point of view.
    Being from the UK I would advise you that currently most of our ‘fashionably radical’ commentators, satirists, humourists and their devoted followings seem intent on blaming every adult in the USA for President-Elect Trump, and thus in their ‘enlightened’ and ‘savvy’ way you are all pariahs. I personally have a great fondness for your nation and your people (Don’t worry folks I’m not trying to convert you to socialism, the type I believe in just would not work in a land as large and diverse as yours). Thus I find this fashionable americaphobic view distasteful, narrow-minded and ignorant. So I wish you well folks.
    My last words are, from the lessons of history there are storms coming, financial, social, and geo-political. We’ve been through in Europe before, and you have in previous ages. It is time to stop the insults and the accusations. It is time for you to agree to differ ad work together. And of course keep on reminding your elected officials why you put them there and what they promised to you.
    Take care all
    Roger

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for your thoughtful viewpoint. The extremists who have invaded this discussion made me forget that there are reasonable and intelligent people out there who are capable of discussing things on a reasonable basis.

      Before the “conservatives” began their ascent with Reagan, the U.S. was beginning to reach out to its poor in an attempt to “raise the floor” in areas like healthcare and the basics of survival, what the current crop of hard-hearted politicians call socialism. Before Reagan and in spite of Nixon we had been trying to.heal from the economic and racial divisions that remained from the slavery that had poisoned the country and the racism that remained. The conservatives have worked very hard to destroy all of those efforts, and succeeded in many ways, so that we as a country are far poorer as a result.

      The only thing that prevents European-style socialism from working in this country is the corruption of big corporation’s ownership of the political machinery, a situation which Trump is only going to make worse. The corporations want no brakes on their ability to confiscate the wealth of those that are unfortunate enough to require medical care, as an example, and have corrupt control over enough of the government at all levels too be able to prevent the government addressing the needs of the citizens over the corporations’ greed.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Looking from the outside the one fundamental which interests me in the US society is the circumstance of a written constitution. In the UK our constitution is built of an elect mix of law, court interpretations of law, common-law (or conventions), parliamentary procedure & precedence, traditions and anything else the people of these isles threw into the mix. Thus we have no one set of written rules.
        Thus the interactions of the people of the US with their constitution although alien, is one which possibly an outsider can view clearly. The one aspect which strikes me is how all sides will refer to the written word of the constitution to argue their case (Human Nature being what it is that means selecting the words favourable to their side-nothing new there we all do it). When observing this, it has struck me how all sides have an inbuilt distrust of central government (We have one in the UK but our approach is…we’re stuck with it!). Thus both sides almost use the same words and nearly the same arguments to reach quite widely different conclusions.
        From my, albeit socialist perspective it would seem each side has more in common than it suspects. Regrettably the violent extremist of both sides (violence in terms of verbal and physical) naturally have the higher profiles and for their own profits or vanities use this to increase their own currency.
        This is therefore a time for both sides moderate wings to sit down and ponder on what the other side has to say and ignore the demagogues, for it is these who are currently holding centre stage.
        At the risk of sounding apocalyptical the last thing that is needed here is a re-run of the 1850s & 1860s. My concern is based upon a fracturing along social and community lines. I would not envisage a civil war as such, but more of an even messier version of our own Brexit.
        If there was ever a time for the citizen to use Soft Power it is now; the temperature has to be lowered. I suspect that both Trump & Clinton realised that.

        Liked by 2 people

        • The distrust of central government has been created and fostered malice-aforethought by the Republican Party starting with Ronald Reagan, but has become such an article of faith across society that nobody dare question it except a few of us out crying in the wilderness.

          Another point you make – about the moderate wings sitting down, etc. – has been made impossible because the extremes of the parties are the only ones to create any new ideas, and the fact is that the middle has been discredited through their own issues and by manipulation by the forces on the right who want to bring the whole system down and replace it with a theocracy.

          I am saddened by your observation of the rerun of the 1850’s – from the inside it looks like a class war with its roots in the slavery and class divide that was the official excuse for the south starting the civil war. The south was losing out to the industrial north, and was under economic pressure to update its economic base, but that would have meant that the existing upper class with its roots in agriculture and slavery would have lost its power and income to the industrialists, which inevitably happened anyway.

          The trump election was the last gasp of the white male power base with its blue-collar roots, since there is almost no more blue-collar economy, and the white male power is falling aside as the divides in society shift. The whites are now just another minority, and are angry about their loss of power and income, but in general they are either unable to raise their skill level to that required by the knowledge-based economy, or simply refuse.

          For many of this class, if not most of them, they are economically unable to upgrade their education due to the increasingly outrageous cost of education. Their real income has fallen drastically over the last twenty years, and they are fighting with every bit of energy they have just to tread water, so I cannot be unsympathetic to their situation. Since the repubs in power have refused to allow any money to be spent for social programs, their voting base is being destroyed economically, a situation which they have been oblivious to and which in large part this election result was a reaction to.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Good Morning Richds (UK time 09:45am)

            The concerns you expressed can be viewed to periods before The Regan Era. Although this is a starting point for the discussion on the current situation, that era itself has foundations in earlier times. Robert A Caro’s volumes on the pollical career of Lyndon Banes Johnson are very detailed documentation on the political system and motivations from the 1940s to the pre-Vietnam War era. Although very, very long books they are worth a read (put aside a year of reading time!) as it gives an insight into what might be crudely classed as The Modern Era of US politics. This foundation in turn has to be looked at through the perspective of the US’ history which in European, African, Middle Eastern, Far Eastern and Asian terms is short; for the sake of convenience let’s say 400 years. In terms of nationhood we can use 1776. So in historical terms The USA is still in a formative or transitory nature; as some historians call it ‘The American Experiment’. In this circumstance, many turbulent changes can take place. The themes and expression are not new; there are certain resonances of The Know Nothings of the 1800s, as well as Free Soilers, and the myriad grass roots movements which worked for an equitable deal for the farmers.
            The current state of the economy and its social implications can of course be laid at the door of the speculative and ‘ethereal’ nature of financial trading markets, whose activities in the creation of true wealth for the ordinary person are highly questionable. Again this is not a new circumstance disruptions through financial speculations occur in history regularly (a bizarre one being on the Dutch Bulb market in the 16th century – a sort of Futures Crisis).
            Thus the situation which is happening both in the US and the UK has been played out historically before. The circumstance can only be satisfactorily solved by the application of Soft Power; those on both moderate or conciliatory wings must be ready to state their cases, seek common ground and either ignore the storms of the extremists or attempt to convert them. Confrontation politics leads in its final conclusion to a solution which has to be solved by military or quasi-military means. In this History cannot be ignored in this.
            Everyone must therefore talk, and also listen.
            This is vital at this stage

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      • The challenge we have is that of a country with too many weapons and people who are too willing to use them for no serious reason. There are people who want a Civil War to begin, much as their are people who believe the Second Coming requires a nuclear war to happen. (Yes, such people exist.) Trump is probably going to anger people on both the far left and the far right, as he keeps some campaign promises and reneges on others. I know the changes to Medicare are going to anger a lot of people, many of whom voted for him. (I blogged on that earlier today. Healthcare costs will go up for seniors, probably by a lot, as they cut the basic services covered under Medicare and force seniors to buy more expensive private insurance.) The professor who predicted Trump’s election is now forecasting his impeachment. I think Trump will be lucky to stay in office for four years.

        Liked by 1 person

        • I too have blogged on these things also – see my Recycled Electrons blog if you care – and agree with you completely. I too predicted his impeachment, by the repubs because of some of the political promises he made, at least if he follows through on them.

          I will also be cheering as he is impeached, since, like many observers, I see the people coming into office creating the most corrupt presidency in history. I find it hilarious that the Trumpite have accused the democrats of corruption, and have stated that I thought that the oilers have been run out of town,

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            • Trump has never been innocent of anything he charges anybody else with. If he hasn’t done it, he doesn’t understand it. That said, a corrupt person accusing someone else of corruption is always a distraction, except to the people that want to believe it.

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    • I did not vote for Trump nor do I like the idea he is president. However “it is what it is” and those American citizens who spout nothing but “hate” towards Trump are no better than the racists who spout hate. Kakuzan writes of “ugliest parts of America”. What do you mean by this? What “parts of America are you talking about” What makes them the “ugliest parts of America? You are judging a large segment of this country for what? As far as “racism” goes, the majority of Trump supporters are not “racists”. They are Americans who are fed up with the two political party establishments that take care of only the 1% and corporations. There is not one man/woman to blame or one political party to blame. It’s a combination of both.

      Liked by 1 person

      • This has been an event just waiting to happen. There has risen in the US & the UK a class of professional elected representatives who tend to be motivated by theory rather than a belief arising from being at one with the voters.
        Both ‘Brexit’ and President-Elect Donald Trump tapped into this.
        We know what they are against. The test know is do they really know what they want and how to achieve it? For the world around them will not stand still.
        We must see, and WE, the people must do what we can to damp down Hate & Intolerance.
        Let our watch words be Compassion.Respect. Tolerance.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Woebegone..I did not vote for Trump. However, if I had read your post before doing my own, I would not have had to post at all. I agree with everything you wrote. I’m posting like crazy trying to get people in my country to “calm down”! I tell them if we can “survive”G.W. Bush for eight yrs., we certainly can “survive” Trump for four! Best Wishes.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. College protests are always so much fun. After September 11, 2001, and the war in the middle east and all of that fall-out, we had anti-war rallies. Within moments, two dudes sitting in the back up a pick-up truck, flying an American flag, sat there drinking domestic beer and blaring country western 9/11 tribute songs.

    Land of the free!

    Like

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